Dennis Hong: My 7 species of robot

http://www.ted.com At TEDxNASA, Dennis Hong introduces seven award-winnning, all-terrain robots — like the humanoid, soccer-playing DARwIn and the cliff-gripping CLIMBeR — all built by his team at RoMeLa, Virginia Tech. Watch to the end to hear the five creative secrets to his lab’s incredible technical success.

TEDTalks is a daily video podcast of the best talks and performances from the TED Conference, where the world’s leading thinkers and doers give the talk of their lives in 18 minutes. Featured speakers have included Al Gore on climate change, Philippe Starck on design, Jill Bolte Taylor on observing her own stroke, Nicholas Negroponte on One Laptop per Child, Jane Goodall on chimpanzees, Bill Gates on malaria and mosquitoes, Pattie Maes on the “Sixth Sense” wearable tech, and “Lost” producer JJ Abrams on the allure of mystery. TED stands for Technology, Entertainment, Design, and TEDTalks cover these topics as well as science, business, development and the arts. Closed captions and translated subtitles in a variety of languages are now available on TED.com, at http://www.ted.com/translate. Watch a highlight reel of the Top 10 TEDTalks at http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/top10

Duration : 0:18:48


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Technorati Tags: all-terrain, CLIMBeR, DARwIn, Dennis, Hong, NASA, robotics, robots, RoMeLa, talks, tech, TED, TEDTalks, TEDx, TEDxNASA, Virginia

25 thoughts on “Dennis Hong: My 7 species of robot

  1. @ …
    @SomethingSoOriginal But he said he has his own database of Ideas! He deserves one!

  2. The audience didn’t …
    The audience didn’t get the feeling that he HIMSELF created anything new, rather he was presenting some new ideas in robotics to them. Most of the time standing ovations are given to those who have personally contributed to thier respective fields.

  3. these …
    these people clap and laugh at bill gates but not this? what the is this about

  4. Strider inspired by …
    Strider inspired by nature? more like strider inspired by the strider from half life (the game on the PC)

  5. The audience was …
    The audience was far more robotic than the ones presented.

  6. “a robot that has …
    “a robot that has three legs that was INSPIRED by nature…”
    No, it was inspired by Half-Life 2.

  7. Yeah, Bio inspired …
    Yeah, Bio inspired but really not, Stars Wars and Colors in your dreams; this is why you have? no idea what to do with the robots and you need to copy from others… bla bla bla… you are losing time and money hard heads…

  8. Yeah, Stars Wars …
    Yeah, Stars Wars and Colors in your dreams; this is why you have no idea what to do with the robots and you need to copy from others… bla bla bla… you are losing time and money hard heads…

  9. People also is …
    People also is affraid that robot get there jobs !!!!!!!!!! and they also affraid that chinese control them with robots !!!!! i can read in there minds 🙂

  10. People are affraid …
    People are affraid of chineses invention !!!!!!!! it’s the reason why they’re not so entousiast hihihi !!

  11. the robots are …
    the robots are amazing~ and his ways of doing research is also inspiring

  12. A thought about the …
    A thought about the Stockholm/Congestion charge thing in the end: This kind of system can only be applied to cities with a functioning colletictive traffic. Buses, Trains, Carts, Tubes etc. I live in Fredrikstad, Norway. It’s too small, and with a practically useless collective traffic option. People will prefer cars in this situation.

  13. @TheWiseCommenter I …
    @TheWiseCommenter I understand your point but I don’t think thats the point of TED. It is not how these things are useful but rather how they become useful; taking those initial steps. Simply put, the wheel would be useless if we didn’t apply it. Also, we didn’t create a wheel and suddenly produce a car, it evolved over many years, through prototyping and improvement. I think what we see in this presentation is the evolution of robotics- towards being usefully applied.

  14. @samiminh I think …
    @samiminh I think they’re reacting but the audience microphone level is quite low

  15. The reason the …
    The reason the audience did not applaud is because the speaker failed to explain how these technological advances could be actually useful in the future. Like many roboticists, he is fascinated by the idea of robots in and of themselves. Normal people however are only interested in how robots can be USEFUL. If you don’t explain that, all we see is slow moving robots that aren’t useful for anything yet, and a bunch of contrived acronyms.

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